I copied this partial post below from http://www.campingroadtrip.com/outdoor-living-newsletter-july-2011/tips-for-safe-mountain-driving-for-rvers  so be sure to check them out! Really valuable info even for little RVs like mine. Those hills get longer and tougher as times goes by. The LT is a good 15-16 years old with lots of miles. I think it used to have more uphill power last year but maybe I was only dreaming.

Currently I’m resting, recovering from allergies and tiredness. Will start up again soon.

Driving uphill

To get your RV through an uphill climb more easily, you need to run your RV within its power band. Your RV’s power band is its engine’s RPM span that delivers the most horsepower. Depending on your RV’s type, the power band can range anywhere between 2,000 to 4,000 RPM. When you drive uphill within its power band, your rig will generate the extra pulling power it needs to ascend the incline.

It is important that you start getting your RV within its power band before you ascend the hill. To achieve this, will have to down shift to a lower gear and then step very gently on the gas pedal. Keep your feet off the gas pedal entirely at times so your engine can do its job more comfortably. If you keep pushing hard on your pedal, you’ll end up with black smoke out of your exhaust and the smell of burning rubber from your tires.

What happens when you are out of your RV’s power band while you are making the climb? If that happens, there is a risk that your RV will be unable to ascend at all. In case your engine stops in the middle of your climb, the first thing you need to do is not to panic. Pull the handbrake, shift to neutral then restart your engine. Once your engine is running again, release the handbrake, downshift to first gear once more and step gently on the gas.

Driving downhill

Experienced RV drivers claim that driving their RV downhill on mountain roads is more difficult than driving uphill. That’s because when driving downhill, you need to maintain absolute control of the wheel and be fully aware of your surroundings. Failure to pay attention can be disastrous – think runaway rig.

To drive your RV safely downhill, prepare for the downhill descent while you are still on top of the hill. The first step is to use your engine for braking, as opposed to using your brakes. To accomplish this, bring your speed down to 40 mph and shift to second gear. At this point, you should feel your engine slowing down to a more comfortable coasting speed. If the engine is not slowing down as much as you’d like it to, shift down to first gear and then decrease your speed to 20 mph.

Slowing down, downshifting and using your engine to brake while driving downhill ought to keep you at a safe speed during your descent. If, despite these efforts, you feel that you’re still going down too fast, don’t hesitate to step on your regular brakes intermittently. Step on your brakes in hard and short bursts instead of pushing the brake for the duration of the descent. If you keep your foot on your brakes, they will end up overheating and your RV’s brake components could be damaged permanently.

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