This trip has been the focus of my energy and hopes for well over a year; actually longer, much longer as I first saw Alaska on a family trip in the late 1960s. My Mom likes to remind me how she rented a cabin for both me and my brother on the Alaska Ferry and neither of us used it! I remember that very well as I was being flirted by a handsome blond stranger and I happily accepted the invitation to sleep on the deck with the other seasoned crew. I longed to see the perfectly formed miniature trees again, the huge humpy bears and the surprisingly warm at 60 deg everlasting light days. When I was young I thought Alaska was a fairy play ground, nature shaping her creatures and plants with a creative flare best suited to mystical beings. I felt at home there and I wanted to return.

After loosing several days travel time to RV repairs and rescheduled flights, I was more than anxious. So much to think about, would my dogs behave, would my 20 year old LT be able to handle the long grind, would my heart be big enough to take in and keep memories, images and dreams to refuel my future? I wanted to know the folk-lore, the history and the mystery of what makes Alaska so special and abundant with her volcanoes, earthquakes, glaciers, powerful wildlife, abundance of birds, high waves, huge forests and her native people. I am a kinesthetic learner; first hand experience is my pandemic, ok not a disease but a driving force.

I am not in Alaska as I write this but in the US struggling with wifi, my air conditioner is going and heavy drops of rain are making music on my RV. How can it be so hot and still rain with this thick heavy wetness like clumps of normal raindrops glued together? This is love to me, the air electric, the unexpected half clear sky, sun, puffy clouds and me in the center of the concert hall.

The first night was a quick sleep at a rest stop near Red Bluff and the next day a stop at Mount Shasta for shopping at the Berryville Natural Grocery and nice little lunch after I’d mistakenly taken the turn up the mountain for the town of Shasta. Not at all the same thing. The second night landed in an RV Park in Salem, the Hee Hee Illahee RV Resort owned and operated by the Siletz tribe, the name means, “A Fun Place to BE,” very cool. I badly needed the hot tub as my Thoracic Outlet Syndrome had flared badly and the pain was nauseating and intense. The jets weren’t working I wanted them to but you know how that goes.

Hee Hee Illahee RV Resort in Salem, Oregon

Hee Hee Illahee RV Resort in Salem, Oregon

Passed this gorgeous lake in OR; there used to be an RV campground nearby… sigh, it is no more. So Beautiful.

A beautiful lake in Oregon

A beautiful lake in Oregon

Had a lunch stop the next day in Olympia. I’d liked this town last time I visited and I still like it.

Olympia, WA

Olympia, WA

 

 

The End of the Oregon Trail

The End of the Oregon Trail

Desert

Camp that night was at the Cedars in Ferndale, A Holiday Trails Resort.

I asked for a quiet and dark spot and got it!  :)

I asked for a quiet and dark spot and got it! 🙂

A Little Friend

A Little Friend

Saw this on my walk

Saw this on my walk

 

Passing though Seattle, just no time to stop.

Passing though Seattle, just no time to stop.

Passing Seattle in a hurry

Passing Seattle in a hurry

 

Then it happened, the first big event!!! The Border! It was early and the line went quickly. I had to give away my half-carton of expensive organic eggs I’d just bought from Whole Foods as a precaution against the Bird Flu. I thought that was ridiculous but I wasn’t going to argue.

The Canadian Border

The Canadian Border

In all places that Pines grow many were dead or dying, rivers were running low, mountain snow was either absent or way too high up for early May. I saw this everywhere, it didn’t matter if the grasses were brown or green, the diminishing effects of water and ice, the alteration of weather patterns of air currents and reflected heat were screaming to anyone listening.

Next up: First Days in Canada

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